Energy Hearings This Week

House Committee on Energy and Commerce  Subcommittee on Environment Hearing: New Source Review Permitting Challenges for Manufacturing and Infrastructure
Witnesses:
Ms. Emily Hammond: Glen Earl Weston Research Professor of Law, The George Washington University Law School; Mr. Jeffrey R. Holmstead: Partner, Bracewell LLP; Mr. Paul Noe: Vice President Public Policy, American Forest and Paper Association and American Wood Council; Mr. Stuart Spencer: Associate Director, ADEQ, Office of Air Quality; Mr. Kevin Sunday: Director of Government Affairs, Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry; Mr. John D. Walke: Clean Air Director, Natural Resources Defense Council
When:  February 14, 2018 @ 2:00 pm EST
Where:  2123 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans Oversight Hearing, “The State of the Nation’s Water and Power Infrastructure”
Witnesses:
Mr. Nick Wiley, Executive Director, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Tallahassee, Florida
Mr. Jeff Kaelin, Government Relations, Lund’s Fisheries, Inc., Cape May, New Jersey
Charles Witek, Recreational Angler and Outdoor Writer, West Babylon, New York
Mr. Sean Martin, President, Hawaii Longline Association, Honolulu, Hawaii
When:  February 14, 2018 @ 2:00 pm EST
Where:  1324 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C., Washington, DC, US

House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources Hearing: H.R. 520 (Rep. Mark E. Amodei)
When: February 15, 2018 @ 2:00 pm EST
Where:  1324 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials Hearing: “Oversight of Positive Train Control Implementation in the United States”
When:  February 15, 2018 @ 10:00 am EST
Where:  2167 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

House Committee on Armed Services Hearing: Strategic Competition with China
Witnesses:  Dr. Aaron Friedberg: Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School; Dr. Ely Ratner: Maurice R. Greenberg Senior Fellow for China Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
When:  February 15, 2018 @ 10:00 am EST
Where:  2118 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

Energy Hearings This Week

Both the House and Senate are in session at the beginning of next week.  House Democrats are still scheduled to depart Wednesday afternoon for their annual issues conference in the Maryland Eastern shore

House Committee on Energy and Commerce – Hearing
Topic: Subcommittee on Energy Hearing: DOE Modernization: Advancing the Economic and National Security Benefits of America’s Nuclear Infrastructure
Time: 02/06/2018, 10:00 AM

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee – Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining Legislative Hearing
Time: 02/07/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

  • S. 414 (Heller) / H.R. 1107 (Amodei), the Pershing County Economic Development and Conservation Act.
  • S. 441 (Udall), the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Conservation Act.
  • S. 507 (Tester), the Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act of 2017.
  • S. 612 (Flake) / H.R. 1547 (McSally), the Udall Park Land Exchange Completion Act.
  • S. 1046 (Heller), the Eastern Nevada Economic Development and Land Management Improvement Act.
  • S. 1219 (Cassidy) / H.R. 3392 (Johnson), the Lake Bistineau Land Title Stability Act.
  • S. 1222 (Flake), the La Paz County Land Conveyance Act.
  • S. 1481 (Murkowski), the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Improvement Act.
  • S. 1665 (Hatch) / H.R. 2582 (Love), the Confirming State Land Grants for Education Act.
  • S. 2062 (Flake), the Oracle Cabins Conveyance Act of 2017.
  • S. 2206 (Daines), the Protect Public Use of Public Lands Act.
  • S. 2218 (Bennet), the West Fork Fire Station Act of 2017.
  • S. 2249 (Udall), the Rio Puerco Watershed Management Program.
  • H.R. 995 (Jefferies), the 21st Century Respect Act.
  • H.R. 1404 (Grijalva), the Pascua Yaqui Tribe Land Conveyance Act.

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee – Markup to consider the nomination of Andrew Wheeler of Virginia, to be Deputy Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency
Time: 02/07/2018, 9:30 AM
Location: 406 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee – Hearing  “The Impact of Federal Environmental Regulations and Policies on American Farming and Ranching Communities.”
Time: 02/07/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: Room 406 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee – Full Committee Hearing on Energy Infrastructure
Time: 02/08/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Energy Hearings Next Week

Both the House and Senate are in session at the beginning of next week.  House and Senate Republicans depart next Wednesday afternoon for the Greenbrier Resort in WV for their annual issues conference.

House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Hearing: Department of Energy: Management and Priorities
Time: 01/30/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 2318 Rayburn House Office Building

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Full Committee Hearing: “Oversight Hearing to Receive Testimony from Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt.”
Time: 01/30/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: Room 406 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee: Full Committee Hearing on Natural Hazards
Time: 01/30/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources markup to consider the nominations of Melissa F. Burnison, of Kentucky, to be an Assistant Secretary of Energy (Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs), Susan Combs, of Texas, to be an Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Ryan Douglas Nelson, of Idaho, to be Solicitor of the Department of the Interior, Anne Marie White, of Michigan, to be an Assistant Secretary of Energy (Environmental Management), and subcommittee assignments for the 115th Congress; to be immediately followed an oversight hearing to examine the role of the Geological Survey and the Forest Service in preparing for and responding to natural hazard events, as well as the current status of mapping and monitoring systems.
Time: 01/30/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy Markup: Subcommittee Vote on H.R. 3477, Ceiling Fan Energy Conservation Harmonization Act
Time: 01/30/2018, 1:00 PM
Location: 2322 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

Energy Hearings This Week

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee: Full Committee Hearing to Examine the Domestic and Global Energy Outlook
Time: 01/16/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee: Subcommittee on Water and Power Hearing to Examine the Bureau of Reclamation’s Title Transfer Process and Potential Benefits to Federal and Non-Federal Stakeholders
Time: 01/17/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee: Full Committee Hearing: “America’s Water Infrastructure Needs and Challenges: Federal Panel.”
Time: 01/17/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: Room 406 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee: Full Committee Hearing to Consider DOE Nominees
Time: 01/18/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure: Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Hearing: “America’s Water Resources Infrastructure: Approaches to Enhanced Project Delivery”
Time: 01/18/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 2167 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

House Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Environment Hearing: Modernizing the Superfund Cleanup Program
Time: 01/18/2018, 10:15 AM
Location: 2322 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

House Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Energy Hearing: Legislation Addressing LNG Exports and PURPA Modernization
Time: 01/19/2018, 9:15 AM
Location: 2322 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

 

Trump’s Busy Year on Energy and the Environment

During his first year in Washington, President Trump made his mark on energy and environmental issues by issuing executive orders (EOs), proclamations, and presidential memoranda.  Seeking to undo regulations enacted during the Obama administration, President Trump withdrew from the Paris climate accord, rescinded the Clean Power Plan, scaled back regulations on the fossil fuel industry, and pushed for more drilling on land and at sea.  Here are some of the most significant executive orders affecting the environmental and energy arena issued in 2017:

1. “Expediting Environmental Reviews and Approvals for High-Priority Infrastructure Projects,” EO 13766. (January 24, 2017.)

This order establishes a new system by which to fast-track the construction of infrastructure projects.  It directs executive agencies to expedite environmental reviews and approvals for all infrastructure projects.  Projects such as electrical grid improvements and upgrades to ports, airports, pipelines, bridges, highways, and other projects that are deemed a “high priority to the nation” should be granted preference in this process.  Governors of States and executive agency heads may request that the Chairman of the White House Council approve infrastructure projects where a Federal review is needed. The Chairman shall provide a response within 30 days. The signing of EO 13766 came on the same day Trump signed Presidential memoranda, which approved the construction of the Keystone XL and the Dakota Access Pipeline, and stipulated that all new pipelines in the United States must be constructed using materials and equipment produced in the United States.

2. “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs,” EO 13771. (January 30, 2017.)

This order states that executive departments and agencies who plan to publicly announce a new regulation must propose at least two regulations which will in turn be repealed. The cost of the implementation of these new regulations must be less than or equal to 0 dollars. If costs above 0 dollars are accrued, the payment of these costs shall be funded through the elimination of more regulations. Advice on the financial aspect of these matters is provided by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. It also directs the head of each agency to keep records of the cost savings and send those records to the president.

3. “Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the ‘Waters of the U.S.’ [WOTUS] Rule,” EO 13778. (Feb. 28, 2017.)

This order calls on federal agencies to revise the Obama administration’s Clean Water Rule or WOTUS Rule. Published in 2015, WOTUS expanded the number of water features subject to regulation under the Clean Water Act (CWA) to include ephemeral streams, channels, ponds, and isolated water features that were not clearly covered by the statute or guidance issued by EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers. But the WOTUS rule can’t simply be repealed through executive order.  Instead, both the Army Corps of Engineers and EPA must go through the federal rulemaking process to replace it.  Acordingly, the order directs the administrator of EPA and the assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works to review the WOTUS Rule and propose a new regulation that either revises or eliminates it.

4. “Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth,” EO 13783. (March 28, 2017.)

This order seeks to dismantle many of the key actions that have been undertaken at the federal level to address climate change.  The order directs EPA to review and potentially rescind or re-write major regulations such as the Clean Power Plan (CO2 emission standards for existing power plants), CO2 emission standards for new power plants, and methane emission standards for the oil and gas sector. It also revokes a number of executive orders and actions, including: guidance on calculating the social costs of greenhouse gas emissions, a moratorium on federal coal leasing, and guidance on how to account for climate change in environmental reviews. Finally, it directs all agencies to review existing regulations, orders, guidance documents, policies, and any other similar agency actions that could burden the development or use of domestically produced energy resources, with particular attention to oil, natural gas, coal, and nuclear energy resources, and to develop recommendations on how to alleviate or eliminate aspects of agency actions that burden domestic energy production.

5. “Implementing an America-First Offshore Energy Strategy,” EO 13783. (April 28, 2017.)

This order reverses an earlier ban on Arctic leasing put in place by the Obama administration, and establishes a national policy of encouraging offshore energy exploration and production.  It revokes decisions to withdraw certain areas of the Outer Continental Shelf in Alaska and the Atlantic Coast from leasing, and directs the Interior Secretary to review areas available for off-shore oil and gas exploration.

6. “Establishing Discipline and Accountability in the Environmental Review and Permitting Process for Infrastructure,” EO 13817. (August 15, 2017.)

This order seeks to ensure that the federal environmental review and permitting process for infrastructure projects is coordinated, predictable, and transparent.  It establishes “One Federal Decision” for major infrastructure projects, assigning each project a lead federal agency and creating a performance accountability system to track its progress. It also sets a goal of cutting the review/permitting time from more than seven years (the current average when an Environmental Impact Statement is involved) to just two years. It also revokes EO 13690, which mandated stricter environmental review standards in floodplains as part of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, and required planners to use flooding predictions that incorporated climate science.

 

President Trump also issued several proclamations and presidential memoranda with significant impacts on the energy sector.  Most notably, President Trump issued a proclamation on December 4, 2018, which substantially reduced the size of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments in Utah.  Utah Republicans called the designations of these monuments overzealous land grabs, and shortly after he took office, Trump promised to end what he called presidential “abuses” and give control of the land “back to the people.” In the end, Trump shrank both monuments by nearly 2 million acres, and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said the borders of other monuments in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, as well as in the West, are under review.

Finally, the heads of federal agencies can also issue directives with major regulatory ramifications.   For instance, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt issued an EPA-wide directive on October 16, 2017 directive to designed to end “sue and settle” practices with the Agency.  These practices involved the use of consent decrees and settlement agreements to resolve lawsuits filed against EPA by special interest groups.  Over the years, outside the regulatory process, these groups used litigation to force federal agencies – especially EPA – to compel the Agency to take certain steps, either through change in a statutory duty or enforcing timelines set by the law, and then EPA will acquiesce through a consent decree or settlement agreement, affecting the Agency’s obligations under the statute. Frequently, these agreements were reached with little to no public input or transparency. Whether this directive truly marks an end to “the days of regulation through litigation,” as Mr. Pruitt proclaimed, remains to be seen.

Join Us In Houston! 2018 Energy and Environmental Outlook Conference

After rescheduling due to Hurricane Harvey, this conference will be held on March 7, 2018 at The St. Regis in Houston, Texas.

This half-day program will include a series of panels featuring law and policy experts discussing the most pertinent federal and state legal, regulatory and political developments. Find out where we are a year into the Trump Administration, what it means for regulation, and what impact it may have on your business.

A full agenda will be available soon.

There is no cost to register for this event.

Lunch will be served, and you are invited to join us for a cocktail reception immediately following the program.

CLE credit is available for this program.

Questions?
Contact Tara Busby at tbusby@kelleydrye.com

Energy Hearings This Week

House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy Hearing: DOE Modernization: Advancing DOE’s Mission for National, Economic, and Energy Security of the United States
Time: 01/09/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 2123 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

House Committee on Armed Services Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities Hearing: China’s Pursuit of Emerging and Exponential Technologies
Time: 01/09/2018, 2:00 PM
Location: 2118 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C.

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Hearing: “America’s Water Infrastructure Needs and Challenges.”
Time: 01/10/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: Room 406 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building

House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology – Markup of H.R. 4675, the “Low Dose Radiation Research Act of 2017”
Time: 01/10/2018, 10:00 AM
Location: 2318 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C

 

EIA report projects fossil and nuclear fuels will provide 83% of total global energy in 2040.

EIA’s International Energy Outlook 2017 projects that world energy consumption will increase by 28% from 2015 through 2040.  The report provides energy consumption projections for 16 world regions, divided according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (“OECD”) members and nonmembers (“non-OECD”).

Non-OECD countries (developing nations like India and China) account for about 84% of this projected increased energy use, with Asia accounting for most of the increase in energy use growth in non-OECD regions.

The report projects significant growth (43%) in natural gas use through 2040.

 

Growth in petroleum and other liquid fuels use (18%) also continues but at a slower pace than natural gas.

Coal energy use is projected to remain near the current level during this period with declines in China offset by increased use in India.

Renewables (hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, etc.) is the fastest growing energy source. Wind, solar, and natural gas supplying the majority share of net electricity generation.

Renewables are projected to supply 31% of world electricity generation in 2040, the same percentage as coal, while hydropower represents 53% of the electricity renewable energy total.

 

In 2040 fossil fuels (petroleum and other liquids, natural gas, and coal) and nuclear are projected to supply about 83% of net global energy consumption with 9% from renewables (wind, solar, geothermal, etc.) and 8% from hydropower.

OECD countries (developed countries like the U.S., Canada, Australia, and OECD-European nations) are projected to reduce CO2 emissions between 2015 and 2040, while the non OECD countries are projected to increase CO2 emissions by about 5.5 billion metric tons.

U.S. CO2 emissions in 20140 are projected fall from 2015 levels and about 19% below the peak year 2005, when the U.S. emitted 6 billion metric tons of CO2.

 

Increased use of natural gas derived from fracking technology is replacing costlier coal sources and is driving reductions in CO2 emissions from OECD and non-OECD countries alike.

Even so, coal energy use continues to comprise the majority of global CO2 emissions and China is projected to remain the world’s largest coal user by a wide margin.

The EIA 2017 IEO report thus shows the continued dominance of fossil fuels in providing the huge majority of global energy consumption for decades to come. It also shows the huge role that the increased use of natural gas is playing in reducing OECD nation CO2 emissions and in lowering the rate of growth of CO2 emissions in non-OECD nations after 2015.  These results thus call into question the wisdom of mandated global CO2 emissions programs and increased renewable energy use when fracking technology has produced dramatic benefits by lowering market price-based energy costs while increase more economic use of lower emissions fuels.

Energy Hearings This Week

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on the “Interior Department’s and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s permitting processes for energy and resource infrastructure projects and opportunities to improve the efficiency, transparency, and accountability of federal decisions for such projects.”
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.
Place: 366 Dirksen Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

Senate Foreign Relations — Subcommittee on Europe and Regional Security Cooperation hearing on “European Energy Security: U.S. Interests and Coercive Russian Diplomacy.”
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.
Place: 419 Dirksen Bldg.
Witnesses:
Assistant Secretary of State for European And Eurasian Affairs A. Wess Mitchell
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Energy Resources John McCarrick testify

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee markup to vote on the nominations of Linda Capuano to be administrator of the Energy Information Administration; and Timothy Petty to be assistant Interior secretary for water and science.
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.
Place: 366 Dirksen Bldg.

House Energy and Commerce — Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection and Subcommittee on Environment joint hearing on “Update on the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Program (CAFE) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Motor Vehicles.”
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.
Place: 2123 Rayburn Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

House Natural Resources — Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing on “Examining Consequences of America’s Growing Dependence on Foreign Minerals.”
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2 p.m.
Place: 1324 Longworth Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation — Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guard hearing on “National Ocean Policy: Stakeholder Perspectives.”
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2:30 p.m.
Place: 253 Russell Bldg.
Witnesses:
Bonnie Brady, executive director of the Long Island Commercial Fishing Association
Christopher Guith, senior vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Global Energy Institute
Dan Keppen, executive director of the Family Farm Alliance
Kathy Metcalf, president and CEO at the Chamber of Shipping of America

House Natural Resources Committee markup of H.R.200, the “Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act”; H.R.1157, to clarify the United States interest in certain submerged lands in the area of the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge; H.R.1349, to amend the Wilderness Act to ensure that the use of bicycles, wheelchairs, strollers, and game carts is not prohibited in Wilderness Areas; H.R.1350, to modify the boundary of Voyageurs National Park in the State of Minnesota; H.R.1675, the “National Landslide Preparedness Act”; H.R.2888, the “Ste. Genevieve National Historical Park Establishment Act”; H.R.3400, the “Recreation Not Red-Tape Act”; H.R.3588, the “RED SNAPPER Act”; H.R.4033, the “National Geologic Mapping Act Reauthorization Act”; H.R.4264, the “Hyde Park Land Conveyance Act”; H.R.4266, the “Acadia National Park Boundary Clarification Act”; H.R.4465, the “Endangered Fish Recovery Programs Extension Act of 2017”; H.R.4475, the “National Volcano Early Warning and Monitoring System Act”; H.R.4568, the “Enhancing Geothermal Production on Federal Lands Act”; S.825, the “Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium Land Transfer Act of 2017”; S.1285, the “Oregon Tribal Economic Development Act.”

Note: Markup will continue on December 13.

Date: Tuesday, Dec. 12, 5 p.m.
Place   1324 Longworth Bldg.
HR 1675 — National Landslide Preparedness Act
HR 1349 — A bill to amend the Wilderness Act to ensure that the use of bicycles, wheelchairs, strollers, and game carts is not prohibited in Wilderness Areas, and for other purposes.
HR 1157 — A bill to clarify the United States interest in certain submerged lands in the area of the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, and for other purposes.
HR 3400 — A bill to promote innovative approaches to outdoor recreation on Federal land and to open up opportunities for collaboration with non-Federal partners, and for other purposes.
HR 4266 — Acadia National Park Boundary Clarification Act
HR 4568 — A bill to amend the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 to promote timely exploration for geothermal resources under geothermal leases, and for other purposes.
HR 1350 — A bill to modify the boundary of Voyageurs National Park in the State of Minnesota, and for other purposes.
S 1285 — Oregon Tribal Economic Development Act
HR 2888 — Ste. Genevieve National Historical Park Establishment Act
HR 4264 — Hyde Park Land Conveyance Act
HR 4475 — National Volcano Early Warning and Monitoring System Act
HR 4465 — Endangered Fish Recovery Programs Extension Act
HR 3588 — Regionally Empowered Decision-making for Snappers Noting the Angling Public and the Preservation of an Exceptional Resource (RED SNAPPER) Act
S 825 — Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium Land Transfer Act
HR 200 — Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act
HR 4033 — National Geologic Mapping Act Reauthorization Act 

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on “Oversight of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.”
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 13, 10 a.m.
Place: 406 Dirksen Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

House Energy and Commerce — Subcommittee on Energy hearing on “The Impacts and Future of North American Energy Trade.”
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 13, 10:15 a.m.
Place: 2322 Rayburn Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

House Science, Space and Technology — Subcommittee on Energy hearing on “Advancing Solar Energy Technology: Research Trumps Deployment.”
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2 p.m.
Place: 2318 Rayburn Bldg.
Witnesses:
Steve Eglash, executive director of strategic research initiatives, computer science at Stanford University
Martin Keller, director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Acting Assistant Energy Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Daniel Simmons
Kenny Stein, director of policy at the Institute for Energy Research

 

Energy Hearings This Week

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on the nominations of Timothy Petty to be an assistant Interior secretary; and Linda Capuano to be administrator of the Energy Department’s Energy Information Administration.
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 5, 10 a.m.
Place: 366 Dirksen Bldg.
Witnesses: The nominees testify

Senate Energy and Natural Resources — Subcommittee on Energy hearing on S.1336, the “Reliable Investment in Vital Energy Reauthorization Act”; S.1455, the “Energy Storage Goals and Demonstration Projects Act”; S.1563, the “Rare Earth Element Advanced Coal Technologies Act”; S.1851, the “Advancing Grid Storage Act”; S.1876, the “Reducing the Cost of Energy Storage Act”; S.1981, the “Small Scale LNG Access Act”; and S.2030, the “Ceiling Fan Energy Conservation Harmonization Act.”
Date: Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2:30 p.m.
Place: 366 Dirksen Bldg.
Agenda and Witnesses:
S 1563 — Rare Earth Element Advanced Coal Technologies Act
S 1455 — Energy Storage Goals and Demonstration Projects Act
S 1336 — A bill to amend the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to reauthorize hydroelectric production incentives and hydroelectric efficiency improvement incentives, and for other purposes.
S 1851 — Advancing Grid Storgae Act
S 2030 — Ceiling Fan Energy Conservation Harmonization Act
S 1981 — A bill to amend the Natural Gas Act to expedite approval of exports of small volumes of natural gas, and for other purposes.
S 1876 — Reducing the Cost of Energy Storage Act
Witnesses:
Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C.
Energy Undersecretary Mark Menezes testifies

Senate Environment and Public Works — Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight hearing on “Challenges Facing Superfund and Waste Cleanup Efforts Following Natural Disasters.”
Date:Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2:30 p.m.
Place:  406 Dirksen Bldg.Witnesses           TBA

House Science, Space and Technology — Subcommittee on Research and Technology hearing on “From Lab to Market: A Review of NSF (National Science Foundation) Innovation Corps.”
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 6, 10 a.m.
Place: 2318 Rayburn Bldg.
Witnesses:
Dawn Tilbury, assistant director of the NSF Directorate for Engineering
Steve Blank, adjunct professor of management science and engineering at Stanford University
Dean Chang, associate vice president of innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland, and lead principal investigator of the DC I-Corps Regional Node
Sue Carter, professor of the Department of Physics, and director of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development at the University of California, Santa Cruz

House Natural Resources — Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations hearing on “Transforming the Department of the Interior for the 21st Century.”
Date: Thursday, Dec. 7, 10 a.m.
Place: 1324 Longworth Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

Environment Subcommittee of House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on “The Mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.”
Date: Thursday, Dec. 7, 10 a.m.
Place: 2123 Rayburn Bldg.
Witnesses: TBA

House Energy and Commerce — Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations hearing on “Examining the Role of the Department of Energy in Energy Sector Cybersecurity.”
Date: Friday, Dec. 8, 9 a.m.
Place: 2123 Rayburn Bldg.
Witnesses: Bruce Walker, assistant secretary of the Energy Department’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, testifies

 

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